Minimizing Disruptive Behaviors to Facilitate Student Learning

Minimizing disruptive behaviors to facilitate student learning by Jack Caldwell, John Hawes, and L. Scott Philyaw, PhD Effective classroom management is rarely part of our formal training as faculty members. Yet, we are still expected to respond to a variety of external pressures impacting campus climates across the nation. Whether a student is passively disinterested or actively disruptive, their behaviors can impact the learning experience of the entire class. The following tips are intended as a starting point to facilitate further conversation and consideration. In addition, we invite you to consult the CFC Educational Development team for further guidance by calling our main number, 828-227-7340.   Much disruptive behavior arises from students who feel alienated from the class. This can be minimized by creating a sense of community in the classroom. Know and use your students’ names. A professional classroom atmosphere also facilitates positive student learning. Model the behavior you expect from students.  For example, speak in a normal voice.  Listen to student’s questions and comments and respond respectfully. Have a contagious positive attitude.  Treat every day as a new opportunity for success in your classroom.  Don’t assume the worst of your students. Boredom can contribute to disruptions. If your lessons are unclear, disorganized, or not engaging, students may shift their attention elsewhere. Move around your classroom throughout the class period when you’re teaching and when students are doing...

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